Our Concern

Green Scenery is concerned that 60% of the total area in one of the districts in Sierra Leone could soon be converted for large-scale industrial oil palm plantations.

Read more

In the Media

Green Scenery partners launch Bike Riders Union more

Ban on explosives

In the last 1989 to 1990, Green Scenery took up the campaign to ban dynamite fishing in which explosives were used along the coast line of particularly Freetown to fish. The explosions racked through the shorelines encompassing the breeding places of fishes and other sea biodiversity. The explosions also posed a serious threat to structures and buildings along the coastline. By 1991 when the rebel war commenced the spate of dynamite fishing had escalated to a minimum of 15 explosions per day within Freetown.  This was also becoming a further concern to national security as explosions scare peaceful citizen.
Green Scenery made innumerable appeals in Newspapers including press releases and briefings before the event of May 1991 when the military seized power. With the onset of the military government, Green Scenery further wrote to the government expressing its concerns about the ramifications of dynamite fishing with little action from that government. Tirelessly the organization continued to advocate through media releases the need to eliminate dynamite fishing highlighting not only the environmental insecurity but human insecurity as well.
In the late 1991 at the height of rebel scares in Freetown, in the late hours of the morning, a massive explosion racked the Aberdeen axis of the city. Aberdeen is in close proximity to the military headquarters, Cockeril. The explosion instilled fear in the residents of the city and brought the military out to investigate the incident. Green Scenery seized the opportunity to remind the public and the government that such incident were one of the pointers to our concerns and called on the government to promulgate a law to ban dynamite fishing and other bad fishing practices. The law came into effect soon after placing a ban on all forms of “explosive and noxious” fishing methods.
In the last 1989 to 1990, Green Scenery took up the campaign to ban dynamite fishing in which explosives were used along the coast line of particularly Freetown to fish. The explosions racked through the shorelines encompassing the breeding places of fishes and other sea biodiversity. The explosions also posed a serious threat to structures and buildings along the coastline. By 1991 when the rebel war commenced the spate of dynamite fishing had escalated to a minimum of 15 explosions per day within Freetown.  This was also becoming a further concern to national security as explosions scare peaceful citizen.


Green Scenery made innumerable appeals in Newspapers including press releases and briefings before the event of May 1991 when the military seized power. With the onset of the military government, Green Scenery further wrote to the government expressing its concerns about the ramifications of dynamite fishing with little action from that government. Tirelessly the organization continued to advocate through media releases the need to eliminate dynamite fishing highlighting not only the environmental insecurity but human insecurity as well.

In the late 1991 at the height of rebel scares in Freetown, in the late hours of the morning, a massive explosion racked the Aberdeen axis of the city. Aberdeen is in close proximity to the military headquarters, Cockeril. The explosion instilled fear in the residents of the city and brought the military out to investigate the incident. Green Scenery seized the opportunity to remind the public and the government that such incident were one of the pointers to our concerns and called on the government to promulgate a law to ban dynamite fishing and other bad fishing practices. The law came into effect soon after placing a ban on all forms of “explosive and noxious” fishing methods.

Donate

Events

January 2013: Launch of the Global Hunger Index 2012 in Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone is ranked 71st out of 79 countries.

Read More

Videos